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Bob Frassinetti Biz for all Argentina
Tuesday, 3 March 2015
Building for Art Museum Gallery
Topic: Art Museum Gallery
Building a Art Museum Gallery
Now Playing: Art + Toy Galler Museum Real Estate here in Argentina
Topic: Bob Frassinetti
... you have all, I am sure invested in Real Estate, but,, ever thought about
taking in a step forward,...... its might be Time! Today's erratic market, with
more downs than ups might be a benefit for us all. Real Estate here in
Argentina, looks more than a Commodity thank just putting money in
Properties,...... Today, I have developed a New Idea for Real Estate, and its
not only in Bricks, but, coned in a phrase, in Art + Bricks + Land, ......

Rockefeller once went to Europe, bought antiques, placed them in a his own
Museum, made replicas and sold those, keep the original pieces,.............

Here we go one step further, we do the same, we Buy Land, enough to Build a good
seized Gallery Museum, place our Art inside it, and the Extra is a Hip Hop like
Hotel + Apartment, with just a few rooms, one for each of our Original
Investeurs, decorated as each they wish, and then we go public, renting in out
to the ever growing numbers of travelers here in Argentina,..... Not only our
local travelers, but, also the International ones, ........

Selling our replicas and also making a by product from the Land, in this case a
Vodka from the cactus Fruit cultivated in the north of Argentina, Vodka is
becoming a special drinks, thsoe flavored with exotic tastes, ...

The Price of Land here in the North of the Provence of Cordoba is low just a
around 1500 US$ the hectare, ideal for cultivating Pear Cactus, which also can
be eaten as a fruit,......... An ideal spot, located in the Valley of the Villa
of Tulumba gives us a village some 300 years old, untouched, unexplored and with
a micro climate that makes it great for all year round visit's,..... just in its
Annual Celebartaion more than 27,000 locales visit the Village in a week!

The Village is located on the once known Royal Road to Alto Peru, where gold and
silver came down to the City of Buenos Aires to go back to the Kings of Europe
and manufactured goods and new immigration moved in, ...... Today, we can Export
Vodka to the World. Replicas of our Art Works or even Original Art Works from
Local Artist in the area, from silver to gold to art in all its forms,.........
as well as a stop in anyone's journey around Argentina!

You all know me, we have been in contact before, either on Art or Antiques or
some Collectible, or even just information that we provide for our readers on
our Blogs or Websites, so let me go a step further and tell you a bit more 
about myself, Bob Frassinetti, Enterpreneur in the World of art, art collecting
and international antiques dealer as well as free lance journalist from
Argentina, Buenos Aires, working on the web, writing both for pleasure and work
on art, antiques and collectibles, in and on Buenos Aires, Argentina as well are
neighboring countries, Chile and Uruguay. "I've written for several Travel
Adventure, Art & Antiques Magazines on and off the web and have researched Toys
made here in Argentina, as well as Travel Adventure from Route 40 and Lighthouse
Adventures along the Atlantic and Pacific coast, following like always the Dakar
Rally from 2009, 2010,2011, and again 2012! Join me now as we are "Building a
Gallery Museum in the Province of Cordoba" Real Estate Investment in Art Bricks
and Land, we are and have purchased Land for cultivating Cactus Pear Fruit, and
then processing it into wine and Vodka, we are Building a Gallery Museum to
Exhibit local Art and Artist as well as our exclusivity Art and Toy Museum
Collection ........ Travelling for Art and Antiques" in all South America and I
have been on line since 1996 .

Exporting Art and Antiques World Wide
Living with art and antiques and travelling the south of South Amercia.
Argentina, Chile and Uruguay
San Telmo, Buenos Aires Argentina 

Posted by bob frassinetti at 5:07 PM
Tuesday, 19 August 2014
"Ser Dueno de un Museo es posible!
Topic: Art Museum Gallery
Los nuevos fideicomisos en proyectos productivos / Inversion en Ladrilos + Arte on una herramienta de inversión no tradicional y permiten financiar todo tipo de emprendimientos productivos. Desde viñedos, olivares, caña de azúcar, cereales y forestación hasta el turismo sustentable en reservas naturales..... entre lo mas novedoso, "Ser Dueno de un Museo es posible! Ser Dueno de un Museo es posible Villa Tulumba"..... por mas infomacion Consulte Los fideicomisos pueden estructurarse como acuerdos entre privados o en oferta pública autorizada por la Comisión Nacional de Valores. La ventaja para el fiduciante es que se transfieren al fiduciario determinados activos de su propiedad, dejando a salvo el resto de su patrimonio, dice Rodolfo Papa, autor de Fideicomiso para abogados y contadores. Permite financiarse a un costo menor que otras alternativas más tradicionales, como los préstamos bancarios o las Obligaciones Negociables Pymes. Las pymes obtienen una calificación crediticia superior, detalla Eduardo De Bonis, socio de la consultora de asesoramiento financiero First. Al estar vinculado al flujo de fondos de la firma, como una pyme que vende a supermercados, las cuentas a cobrar que se ceden en fideicomiso pueden tener una mejor calificación a la de la propia pyme, y esto permite acceder a una tasa más conveniente, explica. Según De Bonis, la mayoría de los fideicomisos se destinan a financiar créditos al consumo por parte de cadenas de retail y, cada vez más, se están volcando al agro y firmas de infraestructura. En 2013, el mercado de fideicomisos con oferta pública fue de $ 20.000 millones, según First. El 90% estuvo vinculado a créditos de consumo y retail, hubo unos 800 millones para financiar actividades del agro y $ 150 millones para infraestructura. Un ejemplo classico,....A tal efecto, la fundación creada por el filántropo Douglas Thomkins financió la instalación de un campamento científico y otro en el que se capacita a los pobladores para la producción de artesanías y acondicionamiento de las instalaciones para recibir turismo. El fideicomiso se muestra como una herramienta con ventajas para emprendedores e inversores. Es hora de sumarlo a las clásicas opciones de comprar ladrillos o billetes verdes. Ser Dueno de un Museo es posible! Ser Dueno de un Museo es posible Villa Tulumba Villa Tulumba Latitud -30,3962708 Villa Tulumba Longitud -64,1205521 Nombre: villa tulumba, córdoba, argentina Tipo: Localidad País: Argentina Estado: Córdoba Distrito: Tulumba Localidad: Villa Tulumba Sub-Localidad: NA Closest Dirección: Villa Tulumba, Córdoba, Argentina Ser Dueno de un Museo es possible ART & Toy Museum Gallery Apartamentos Hotel en la Villa del Valley de Tulumba* por Bob Frassinetti INVERSOR EN El CORAZON DE LA ARGENTINA nuestro PROVINCIA de Córdoba. The Buenos Aires Toy Museum, el Museo del Juguete Argentino. El Primer Museo Argentina en la web desde 1996. El Buenos Aires Toy Museum viene haciendo trabajos de investigación y recuperación de la historia cultural y social de la Argentina a través de una de las formas más expresivas de expresión social que son sus juguetes. Reflejos de la realidad, pequeños objetos a escala que han moldeado nuestra historia, nuestro presente, nuestra infancia, y tantos otros aspectos de nuestra existencia. Con cada avance de investigación, cada descubrimiento y cada nuevo dato que encontramos estamos más y más entusiasmados y convencidos de la importancia del trabajo que encaramos diariamente. El feedback que recibimos de nuestros lectores y visitantes nos da aliento para seguir adelante en esta fabulosa empresa. Es por eso que abrimos la convocatoria a todos aquellos que interesados en el tema y en la propuesta que hacemos desde el BA Toy Museum, a participar directamente en este proceso de recuperación cultural. Nuestro objetivo como museo es conseguir nuestro propio espacio físico. Más allá del inestimable valor que le damos al virtual, el primer museo del juguete argentino busca casa propia y lo hemos logrado! Próximamente The Buenos Aires Toy Museum on-line, se va a convertir en el primer Museo y Gallería en un complejo de Boutique Hotel y Apartamentos al estilo de un Museo Galleria sobre Arte y Juguetes en la Argentina y Bob Frassinetti junto a un grupo de Inversionistas Nacionales e Internacionales, lanzan el primer Boutique Hotel y Gallería de Arte y Museo de Juguete proyectado por la zona de Nord-oeste de la Provincia de Córdoba, Argentina. Un exitoso modelo de inversión inmobiliaria que permite ser dueño y huésped a la vez, participar no solo obteniendo una mayor rentabilidad en el alquiler de la unidad y la posibilidad de utilizar los servicios del hotel y el Museo Gallería a través de una membrecía especial, pero también disfrutar de todo los servicios del lugar ............ Museo y Gallería, Taller de Arte y Juguetes, Teatro, eventos culturales propios mas una relación intima y cercano con su ubicación geográfica y su Pueblo, la Villa del Valle de Tulumba mas todos los emites de la vida moderna desde WiFi, TV, habitaciones y departamentos de un nivel Internacional sin perder lo autónica de nuestro estilo de vida, con parque, hasta pileta climatizado, algunos otros deportes y actividades al aire libre hasta la participación en Car Rallys, Cabalgatas Gauchas, Homenajes Históricos, con fuerte envasáis de la participación con pueblos vecinos, artistas y todo la gente de la Zona* * a solo 1 hora 10 minutos del Aeropuerto Internacional Córdoba, Argentina. Por todo esto lo invitamos a ….. CONSULTE FECHA de la iniciación de INVERSORES en el ART Toy Museum Gallery Apartamentos Hotel en la Villa del Valley de Tulumba, Córdoba, Argentina INICIO de LA INVERSIÓN PREGUNTAS FRECUENTES CÓMO INVERTIR? EN QUÉ INVIERTE Art and Toy Museum Gallery and Bob Frassinetti Conact by Email: Email: admin@frassinetti.com Bob Frassinetti.

Posted by bob frassinetti at 2:39 PM
Wednesday, 22 September 2010
Building Art Toy Museum Gallery Apart-Hotel
Topic: Art Museum Gallery
Art Toy Museum Gallery Apart Hotel Villa Tulumba Cordoba Argentina
Art Toy Museum Gallery Apart Hotel Villa Tulumba Cordoba Argentina. The Buenos Aires Toy Museum, el Museo del Juguete Argentino. El Primer Museo Argentina en la web desde 1996. Investment Opportunity an ongoing Real Estate Project for a arts and collectibles boutique hotel-apartments with museum gallery. More Information Collectors, Collectibles and Investments It often comes to my mind that life’s all about taking pleasure in the things you do. Taking the most out of everything in the best possible terms. It’s not a matter of constant profit’s calculation. I’m an artdealer, a collector. It comes from my heart, it’s an inner impulse. I enjoy very much a great item, interesting crafting, the uniqueness in the things I owe. I have collected items even before I was an artdealer; all sort of interesting things that caught my eye. When I was a child, this actions of mine were referred as hobbies, now, I’m a collector, into collectibles. I don’t mind labels. Recently I got hold of an article about investing in collectibles. A very interesting piece that touched different approaches to this inversion in question. Throughout the article the author approached the pros and cons of investing in collectibles, the sales profits, the losses throughout time and the low return of your investment… It’s obvious, an item goes a long way before it’s appreciated as an antique or vintage item. For example, Christie’s –the famous British auction house- has just recently began to auction 1970s vintage items. So, you can figure out how long you’ll have to wait… To us, collectors, waiting is not a problem, and our collectibles are not just mere money investments of which we’re expecting a monetary return soon. Most of our returns are passionate feelings awaked by the beauty of the item we’ve acquired, non tangible profits are one of the best possible returns for a collector. The exact moment in which you spot the object of your afection, when you point it out from the crowd and decide it has to be yours, has no price. Collectibles go all the way from toys to scholar items, from stamps to sculptures, art pieces, vintage trains and antique cars… Indeed, our collectibles are investments. Of course these items can be bought and sold over and over, and in each transaction we can make some extra money. But investing in collectibles is not just about the money, and anyone who’s a collector knows what I’m talking about. We, collectors, invest our time and money not just in the purchase of the item in question but also in its conservation and also in its background history. Investing in collectibles is exiting and interesting. But I don’t think we look at this “investment” in monetary terms, at least not the whole of it. I think collectors are natural investors that consider the economical side as much as the emotional and non tangible ones. At the moment The Buenos Aires Toy Museum and Artdealer are developing a profitable Real Estate holding investment, thought by collectors for fellow collectors. Purchasing a property in one of lovely Provincies of Argentina, the Province of Cordoba, in a small and most exclusive areas and developing a boutique lodging. A special location for collectors from all over the world who appreciate Argentinean made items –from vintage toys to art-, customized rooms exhibiting one of a kind collectibles, special experts on Argentinean collectibles arranging antique hunts to unknown and valuable markets within Buenos Aires, are just some of this investment’s attractive features. In terms of investments, Argentinean Real Estates is one of the most profitable ventures at the moment offering USD investment, with income and potential for capital gain as well as great returns. As I’ve stated before, collectors invest with tangible and non tangible returns in terms of their collectibles and are investors by nature. Bob Frassinetti. Buenos Aires and Villa de Tulumba, Argentina Bob Frassinetti, art and antique dealer and free lance journalist from Argentina, Buenos Aires, working on the web, writing both for pleasure and work on art, antiques and collectibles, in and on Buenos Aires, Argentina as well are neighboring countries, Chile and Uruguay. "I've written for several Travel Adventure, Art & Antiques Magazines on and off the web and have researched Toys made here in Argentina, as well as Travel Adventure from Route 40 and Lighthouse Adventures along the Atlantic and Pacific coast, Dakar Rally 2009, 2010 and now for a 3erd time, 2011, and now we are “Building a Gallery Museum in the Province of Cordoba” Real Estate Investment ........ Travelling for Art and Antiques" and I have been on line since 1996
Contact us, Bob Frassinetti 
Topic: Art Museum Gallery Próximamente el Art and Toy en 3D, el primer Museo y Gallería en la Argentina y por Bob Frassinetti junto a un grupo de Inversionistas Nacionales e Internacionales, lanzan el primer Boutique Hotel y Gallería de arte y Museo de Juguete proyectado por la zona de Junín, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina. Un exitoso modelo de inversión inmobiliaria que permite ser dueño y huésped a la vez, participar no solo obteniendo una mayor rentabilidad en el alquiler de la unidad y la posibilidad de utilizar los servicios del hotel a través de una membrecía especial, pero también disfrutar to todo los servicios del lugar ............ BIENVENIDOS A BUENOS AIRES TOY MUSEUM El Buenos Aires Toy Museum tiene el inmenso placer de invitarte a conocer pronto su nuevo sitio Web en español y en 3D, donde encontrarias nuevas secciones, notas, entrevistas a fabricantes, investigaciones, concursos, subastas, cientos de fotos sobre los juguetes y figuritas producidos en la Argentina a lo largo de la historia y una breve resena sobre cada uno de ellos. Nuestra intencion como miembros del primer museo del juguete argentino es que este sitio no se convierta en una mera exposicion sino en un espacio de conocimiento y aprendizaje para todo aquel que la visita, y en pos de este fin es que desarrollamos esta nueva pagina. Nuestros equipos periodisticos, de investigacion y de diseno trabajaron duramente para hacer esto posible, y lo siguen haciendo en vi­as de su perfeccionamiento. Esperamos que nuestro nuevo sitio Web en español y en 3D sea de tu agrado y que te conviertas en un asiduo visitante del museo, que semana a semana se actualizará para brindarte una mayor información y un mejor servicio. Tu satisfaccion es lo mas importante para nosotros. Por eso te pedimos que nos envias tus comentarios sobre el sitio. Tus consejos, datos, reprimendas, felicitaciones y preguntas sobre la comercializacion de los objetos son muy utiles para todos los que hacemos posible este proyecto, ya que nos sirven para mejorar aquello por lo que diariamente trabajamos. Sin mas palabras por mi parte, clickea en la direccion que te enviamos e ingresa en el mundo de los juguetes argentinos...... Desde ya, muchas gracias. Un saludo fraternal. Bob Frassinetti. http://www.the-ba-toymuseum.com/ Email Bob Frassinetti at the BA Toy Museum. The Buenos Aires Toy Museum, Argentina. Bob Frassinetti. Email Bob Frassinetti at the BA Toy Museum. The Buenos Aires Toy Museum,Argentina. Bob Frassinetti. Copyright 2008 to 2009. Roberto Dario Frassinetti. Topic: Art Museum Gallery Próximamente el Art and Toy en 3D, el primer Museo y Gallería en la Argentina y por Bob Frassinetti junto a un grupo de Inversionistas Nacionales e Internacionales, lanzan el primer Boutique Hotel y Gallería de arte y Museo de Juguete proyectado por la zona de Junín, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina. Un exitoso modelo de inversión inmobiliaria que permite ser dueño y huésped a la vez, participar no solo obteniendo una mayor rentabilidad en el alquiler de la unidad y la posibilidad de utilizar los servicios del hotel a través de una membrecía especial, pero también disfrutar to todo los servicios del lugar ............ BIENVENIDOS A BUENOS AIRES TOY MUSEUM El Buenos Aires Toy Museum tiene el inmenso placer de invitarte a conocer pronto su nuevo sitio Web en español y en 3D, donde encontrarias nuevas secciones, notas, entrevistas a fabricantes, investigaciones, concursos, subastas, cientos de fotos sobre los juguetes y figuritas producidos en la Argentina a lo largo de la historia y una breve resena sobre cada uno de ellos. Nuestra intencion como miembros del primer museo del juguete argentino es que este sitio no se convierta en una mera exposicion sino en un espacio de conocimiento y aprendizaje para todo aquel que la visita, y en pos de este fin es que desarrollamos esta nueva pagina. Nuestros equipos periodisticos, de investigacion y de diseno trabajaron duramente para hacer esto posible, y lo siguen haciendo en vi­as de su perfeccionamiento. Esperamos que nuestro nuevo sitio Web en español y en 3D sea de tu agrado y que te conviertas en un asiduo visitante del museo, que semana a semana se actualizará para brindarte una mayor información y un mejor servicio. Tu satisfaccion es lo mas importante para nosotros. Por eso te pedimos que nos envias tus comentarios sobre el sitio. Tus consejos, datos, reprimendas, felicitaciones y preguntas sobre la comercializacion de los objetos son muy utiles para todos los que hacemos posible este proyecto, ya que nos sirven para mejorar aquello por lo que diariamente trabajamos. Sin mas palabras por mi parte, clickea en la direccion que te enviamos e ingresa en el mundo de los juguetes argentinos...... Desde ya, muchas gracias. Un saludo fraternal. Bob Frassinetti. http://www.the-ba-toymuseum.com/ Email Bob Frassinetti at the BA Toy Museum. The Buenos Aires Toy Museum, Argentina. Bob Frassinetti. Email Bob Frassinetti at the BA Toy Museum. The Buenos Aires Toy Museum,Argentina. Bob Frassinetti. Copyright 2008 to 2009. Roberto Dario Frassinetti.

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Posted by bob frassinetti at 7:55 PM
Tuesday, 7 September 2010
New altrenative ideas for Investment in Art and Antiques
Topic: Art Museum Gallery

Alternative Investment Article: Investment in Art and Antiques

Courtesy of Jayantpai
“Diversification” is the mantra touted by most investment advisors. Effective diversification shields an investor from the vagaries of any one particular asset class. I believe that the Asset Pyramid must have traditional investments such as equity and debt nearer the base and alternative investments closer to the apex. Basically, the higher the quantum of your investible surplus, the longer the ladder you have in order to reach the pyramid’s apex.

 

So which are these alternative investments? Well, in today’s liquidity fuelled world where you often see “investors possessing more dollars than good sense” you find money chasing the unlikeliest of assets. I have read stories about well-heeled investors investing hundreds of thousands of dollars in forests, wine and so on…

For the purpose of this article, I will eschew esoteric assets such as the ones mentioned above and will dwell on “traditional” alternative investments in the form of art and antiques. Both these have caught the fancy of investors recently. The Indian art scene is witnessing a lot of action, with both art prices as well as the number of art auctions hitting new highs. Art galleries are seeking to differentiate themselves through branding and Indian artists are enjoying hitherto unprecedented levels of global attention. The hype and hoopla surrounding art is tempting several traditional investors to dip their toes into these waters.

Yes, there have been a few lucky people who bought a painting or a sculpture for a few thousand rupees, only to sell the same at many multiples of their purchase price. These people often become celebrities in the eyes of the media prominence by the media and that may encourage you to take steps to emulate them.

How rewarding has art investing been in recent times? The graphs given below, answer that question in one word “Very”.

However, is “Art” everyone’s cup of tea?  Not quite.

Prospective investors should be conversant with the unique features of these investments. These are:

1. Art and antiques are extremely vulnerable to fluctuations in public tastes and other factors, so they are considered high-risk, speculative investments.

2. Many believe that you should buy art and antiques primarily because you like them, and only secondarily because they may return a profit.

3. Do not over invest in this asset class.

Despite certain peculiarities, investing in art is not very different from investing in other asset classes.

The difference between investing and speculating is applicable here too. The difference in the two activities involves time and degree of risk.

In speculating, potential risks and rewards are high and the time span is short.

The pre-requisites to succeed in speculation are in-depth knowledge of the investment, quick mental reflexes and nerves of steel. In contrast, investing takes place over a longer time span at a more moderate level of risk. As mentioned above, art and antique prices are extremely vulnerable to fluctuations in public tastes (in addition to other factors associated with most investments), they are considered high-risk, speculative investments.

Also, investment-quality art and antiques are expensive and usually not an option for the small investor. Art and antiques are not a “liquid” investment. This means that they generally cannot be resold quickly for a profit. One reason is that the market for these items fluctuates. If you need to sell your items quickly and the market is down, you could lose money. To earn decent profits, you may need to stay invested for a very long time.

However, art and antiques enjoy an aesthetic edge over other assets, in that they can be used to furnish a home or office thereby enhancing their pedigree.

While art and antiques can be utilitarian, they also can be cumbersome and costly. Often they are fragile, requiring proper environmental conditions, regular maintenance, adequate insurance and security, and frequent appraisals. Transportation, marketing and selling also may be costly and time consuming.

I am hereby reiterating some basic rules to be followed while investing in art:

Find a reputable dealer who has been in the business for many years — long enough to know about quality, market trends and pricing practices in the field in which you want to collect/invest.

Limit the field of your investment collection. Just as holding too many stocks adds very little in terms of incremental diversification, so does holding too many works of art.

Obtain a written appraisal or certificate from a leading appraiser or certifier in your field attesting to the quality and authenticity of the item. This is of paramount importance, as there have been several cases in Mumbai recently, when reputed art galleries inadvertently conducted auctions of fake paintings.

Risk is reduced by information. Read everything you can about your specific area of interest. Consult museums, universities and other collectors or dealers and refer to trade journals (if any), magazines, books and related websites.

As far as possible, purchase top quality items. Top-quality items are expensive (just as top-quality stocks command higher P/E ratios) but they tend to appreciate even during difficult markets. Second and third rung works of art may cost less initially, but may prove to be very costly in the longer run.

Insure the item adequately. Most homeowner policies allow for fire and theft but not natural disasters, such as floods, or accidents. Have your works included on a scheduled form of all risks for coverage in the event of theft, fire etc.

Maintain the artwork properly. If repairs are required, they should be made only by well-trained experts. The value of a poorly maintained artwork diminishes rapidly

Avoid putting more than 10 to 15 percent of the value of your investment portfolio into such investments. Most authorities agree that exceeding this limit may subject your entire investment plan to a high level of risk.

A word on “quality”

Top quality is the best investment. The following generalized guidelines should be helpful in identifying quality:

Build a rapport with art dealers:

Reputed art dealers will have years of experience to offer, and most are willing educators. However, be prepared to pay a steep price for such “education” as most dealers and galleries who operate at the retail level generally indulge in a 50 to 100 percent markup to the buyer.

Auction houses:

Auction houses can serve as excellent sources of art and antiques for slightly experienced investors. Two major advantages are the sheer volume and variety of items offered, and the lack of retail markups, resulting in lower prices. Most publish pre-sale exhibition catalogs describing the items to be sold.

Investing in antiques

Many basic rules of investment in art apply to antiques too:

1. If you are buying as antiques as an investment, the key word is “specialise”. Don’t buy a range of antiques, as “collections” will often appreciate in value more than a mix of items.  Good craftsmanship will hold its value, as will pieces by famous makers. Also, signed objects have better resale value than unsigned ones.

2. It is important to research before investing. Before making your first purchase, try to learn as much about your chosen field as you can. “Caveat emptor” applies in its purest form while purchasing antiques. Fakes and reproductions abound and what seems like a good buy may prove to be a “lemon”.

3. Purchase through a recognised dealer. You will be paying a higher price initially, but consider that as a safety premium. Also, insist on accurate and complete documentation. A good provenance adds to the resale allure of an object as it testifies that the piece is authentic.

4. Invest in antiques with the firm belief that it is a medium to long-term venture.  Also, tempting as it may be, do not invest in works or periods which are currently “hot and happening”. You may be left holding the baby in case of a market decline. The illiquid nature of this market will magnify the pain.

5. Treat your investments with love and care, as unlike stocks, antiques and artworks are hard assets and are prone to physical deterioration if neglected.

Other salient points to watch out for :

  • The particular school of the artist or craftsman and that person’s degree of skill in handling the chosen medium.
  • A traditional, classical form produced in limited number.
  • Good proportion and choice selection of materials.
  • The condition and degree of restoration.

The Indian Art scenario

The first professional Indian art auction was conducted by Christies in 1987. The first Indian painting to fetch a million rupees was M.F. Husain’s tribute to Safdar Hashmi in 1989. In the ’90s, the works of M.F. Husain, Raja Ravi Varma and Ganesh Pyne dominated the auction landscape in cities like New York and London. HEART was the first professional Indian outfit to conduct an auction. This was in 1997.

Since 2000, the growth of the domestic market has accelerated. Osian’s – India’s first art auction house was set up in 2000, followed by Bowrings and SaffronArt (India’s first online auction site).

It is virtually a truism to state that the Indian art market has never been in better shape. In the last three years many art works have fetched over 10 million rupees. The most prominent reasons for the same are :

Increased purchasing power:

Todays, yuppie Indians as well as well-heeled NRIs are evincing keen interest in purchasing artworks. Osian’s, a well known art auction house estimates that the number of NRI buyers should rise around 16 times from the current level of 125 to 2000 by 2007. A telling indicator of the growing interest in auctions is the fact that the paintings sold in Osian’s first auction in 2001 fetched an average price of merely Rs. 1,35,000 while the auction held in September 2006 fetched an average price of Rs. 66 lakhs.

Artists Chart

Also, many buyers are buying for the long term. Hence, supply shortages may surface in the near future owing to a shortage of good floating stock.

Despite these statistics, however, there is a feeling that the Indian market is still at an infant stage and the market for around 85% of the artists remains below the sustainable equilibrium level.

History as a base for credible pricing:

Greater knowledge as regards the links between artistic historical significance and the pricing of art has led to the formation of credible benchmarks (such as the ET Art Index).

Increasing respect for archival and documentation work:

Today, investors have access to credible information in the form of high quality publications of historical and archived artworks. This has helped in pricing stability.

The “bleaching” of our economy:

The slow but steady transformation from a chiefly cash economy into a predominantly white economy has led to higher transparency, leading to confidence in displaying and exhibiting works of art openly.  This is also helping art emerge as a permanent portfolio component for many institutions. Hence it is apparent that Indian art is set to grow in stature.

Launch of dedicated Art Funds:

This is more a fallout rather than a contributory cause to the art boom. Two art funds have also been launched recently. Edelweiss launched the first Fund known as “Yatra Fund” in September 2005 and garnered a corpus of Rs. 10.75 crores. Osian’s recently launched Art Fund garnered an impressive Rs. 102 crores. This fund aims at providing investors capital appreciation through the holding of a cohesive, historically driven portfolio of investment and management in the Contemporary Fine Arts from the Indian sub-continent.

Artists Pension Trust (APT) is a unique international art mutual fund, which plans to raise money in India soon. APT plans to act as a venture capitalist for artists by sourcing money from investors and funding artists who have the talent but not the cash. Each artist, in turn, pledges to hand over 20 of his/her paintings over to the fund over a period of 20 years From the work sold, 40% goes to the artist, 40% goes to the pool of the Trust and is distributed prorata among all the artists and the remaining 20% will be subject to certain holdback, distributed as a management fee to a group subsidiary.

It is debatable whether the market is ready for art funds but it is commendable that a start has been made.

Some of the possible factors that may apply the brake to the momentum are:

The bandwagon effect:

Today there are several art galleries springing up in order to capitalise on the interest on the part of investors. Many of these are first generation gallery owners whose knowledge of art is minimal. It is vital that gallery owners and auction houses undertake adequate due diligence in order to ensure that investors are not saddled with fake paintings or dud antiques.

Safekeeping and insurance:

Both safekeeping standards as well as Art insurance have miles to go before they can be compared to Western standards. Art appraisers and actuaries are hardly adequate to meet the growing demand. Also, insurance companies have not structured insurance products for this market. The sooner that happens the better it is.

Drying up of liquidity:

There are many sceptics who view the resurgence in the art market as a by-product of the wave of liquidity worldwide and hence fear that a reversal of this trend may lead to drying up of interest in art. Of course, one cannot discount this possibility entirely. However, it may also happen that the market will settle at a level much higher than that prevailing around three years ago.

Taxation:

Currently art enjoys the same tax treatment as hard assets such as real estate and gold. Any adverse change (though seemingly unlikely) on this front may damage the market’s growth momentum.

“Creamy Layer” Investment option:

Also, it is unlikely that the common investor will be able to afford to invest in reasonably good quality paintings in the near future. Hence it will remain a passion of the rich.

As the common investor’s money is not at stake, the Government too will not be motivated to strictly regulate the industry. Hence investor acceptance and comfort levels will also hinge on the extent and quality of self-regulation undertaken by the industry players.

In conclusion I state that while the road ahead is a bit foggy there is no doubt that the foundation is slowly being laid for the next level of growth and it will only be a matter of time before art occupies its rightful place as a permanent part of a High Net Worth investor’s portfolio.


Posted by bob frassinetti at 2:19 PM
Wednesday, 1 September 2010
Buy Art Invest in Bricks and Dodge Inflation
Topic: Art Museum Gallery
The received wisdom in countries like Argentina, with years of painful experience of surviving inflation, is that when prices start to gallop, you invest in bricks and mortar. Or a car. Or consumer durables. Or now, perhaps, art.

On Thursday, the city bank of Buenos Aires, Banco Ciudad, which prides itself on being the country’s top bank in the auctions business, holds its third “super special” auction of the year - and is already bracing itself for a packed auditorium and telephone lines buzzing with bids, amid what it says is a “sustained growth in public interest in investing in art”.

In Argentina, where private estimates reckon inflation will end the year at 25 to 30 per cent (well above the discredited official data, which reports that prices have risen 6.7 per cent so far this year), buying art may be a new hedge.

It could also be a way for Argentines to maintain a sense of sophistication. Argentines gloried in their humble peso being equivalent to the mighty dollar during the 1990s - until the unsustainable currency peg spectacularly collapsed in 2001-02.

Whatever the reason, visitors to the auction section of Banco Ciudad’s website have doubled in the past month and there are 20 requests a day to receive auction catalogues online for bidders to browse the relative bargains on offer.

Reserve prices for Thursday’s auction of Argentine artists start as low as 1,500 pesos ($380) and the biggest ticket work is Vito Campanella’s oil on canvas, “La Payada” , which starts with what the bank calls the “very tempting” price tag of 15,000 pesos ($3,800).

The bank’s first two auctions this year raised more than 4.4m pesos ($1.1m) and artworks have gone under the hammer for more than 50 per cent more than their reserve prices.

This experience in Argentina illustrates a wider trend: the rise of art as a new emerging asset class. Forget bonds, stocks, forex or even copper and soya. Bric art is booming, as this article highlights.

Latin American art was the best performing regional art index in the past 25 years at the end of 2009, according to Beautiful Asset Advisors, whose founders Jianping Mei and Michael Moses track the performance of fine art sales against equity market returns via their MeiMoses fine art indices.

Latin American art’s performance has sloped off this year - the following graph shows how it lags the resurgence in demand for post-war and impressionist works - but it remains “very vibrant and viable, especially as wealth continues to accumulate”, according to Mr Moses.

Castlestone Management, a UK fund manager which last year launched the first retail art fund, offering institutional and individual investors the opportunity to diversify out of traditional asset classes, says that when the value of money falls, the value of art, like that of gold, rises.

As its CEO Angus Murray, puts it, art is “an irreplaceable, unleveraged real asset which responds well in a time when the possibility of inflation is on the horizon alongside the rapid decline of the real purchasing power of money.”

Soaring bid and sales volumes at New York and London auctions since late last year prove confidence in the art market is back. “People haven’t suddenly become cultured, it’s a hedge against inflation and shows art is becoming more and more a respected asset class,” says Constanze Kubern, Castlestone’s senior art adviser.

Though “blue chip” artists can prove costly investments - Pablo Picasso’s “Nude, Green Leaves and Bust” sold for $106.5m in New York in May, setting a new world record - art gets good returns, as the following chart from Castlestone shows:

(click chart to enlarge)

And there is plenty of upside yet. Castlestone expects art prices to rise 40 per cent over the next couple of years as the market recovers from lows in 2009.

Emerging market and Latin American art was on the up before the 2009 economic downturn, and is now picking up steam again. Phillips de Pury, one of the other big auction house alongside Sotheby’s and Christie’s, held a Bric auction in London in April, and Latin American art was showcased in the Pinta art show in London in June, a expansion from Pinta’s roots in New York.

Bric and Latin art can be speculative and thus risky, and Castlestone doesn’t own any Latin American art yet - it focuses on the “golden middle” of post-war art where prices and returns are good. But Kubern said she had Colombian artist Fernando Botero on her shopping list.

So emerging market investors may want to grab their cheque books and rush to get seats at the October-November auction season in London and New York. And make sure they have enough cash left over for the ArtBasel fair in Miami Beach in December.

Related:
Nigeria’s art collectors: a nice new market, The Economist
The Rise of the Emerging Art Economy, Businessweek

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Posted by bob frassinetti at 6:29 PM

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